The Kitten to Cat Spring Newsletter

Wednesday, 01 February 2012 20:48

Welcome to our Spring 2012 newsletter.  In this edition:

  1. We welcome new staff member Eva 
  2. Luxury Boarding Reopened!
  3. Back by popular demand: a behavior talk by renowned feline behavioural expert Francesca Riccomini
  4. Acupuncture at Kitten to Cat
  5. A happy ending for Max, the gorgeous Maine Coon

Click here for a PDF copy of the newsletter

 

VIDEO BLOG Part 4 of 4: Stress Free Visits to the Vets

Tuesday, 17 May 2011 21:48

Denise Morris, Head Nurse at Kitten to Cat gave an informative and entertaining talk recently at the London Pet Show in Kensington.  For those who missed it here are some clips from the talk.  Sorry about the amateur camera work! In case you can’t see the video the key points are summarised below.

 

A trip to the vets is often the most stressful parts of a cat’s life.  But it doesn’t need to be. 

Kitten to Cat is a cat only veterinary clinic that was specially designed to reduce stress for cats.  Less stressed patients mean problems are detected earlier, your kitty recovers better from operations and it is just a more enjoyable experience for everyone.  To make the environment as cat friendly as possible we use longer consult times to give your kitty time to adjust and leave her carrier on her own terms, feline pheromones, larger cages with shelves and places to hide and other techniques developed by our cat loving staff.  Of course the main stress factor at vets is the sight and smell of dogs, and at Kitten to Cat this is not an issue.

If you can’t make it to a cat only vets then there are still plenty of things to reduce your kitty’s stress levels.  These include:

Leave the carrier down in the room overnight, or ideally permanently so it is a familiar piece of furniture from the home and not mistaken for a scary torture box that comes out once a year.

Use a top loader cat carrier.  At the start of the consult place the carrier on the floor and see if your cat comes out on her own.  If not then open the top of the carrier to make extraction easier.

Use Feliway(TM) spray in the carrier and in your car 15 mins before leaving.

Ask your vets about cat only appointment times, and if they don’t do these then at least get the first appointment time so there is less chance of them running late and your kitty being stuck in the waiting room with barking dogs.

I hope you enjoyed these videos.  Feel free to call or email us if you ever have any questions about your cat’s health or reducing stress.

VIDEO BLOG Part 3 of 4: The Golden Oldie: Senior & Geriatric Cats

Tuesday, 17 May 2011 21:42

 Denise Morris, Head Nurse at Kitten to Cat gave an informative and entertaining talk recently at the London Pet Show in Kensington.  For those who missed it here are some clips from the talk.  Sorry about the amateur camera work! In case you can’t see the video the key points are summarised below.


This talk covers common health and behavioural issues seen in cats over 7 years of age.

At this stage you should be seeing the vets 4 times per year.  This is because, like in adults, health can deteriorate very quickly and the early onset of problems is often not perceptible to the untrained eye.  Even some diseases such as kidney disease do not show any “clinical signs” until very late in its development and by the time you notice any outward changes over 75% of the kidney function will have been irreparably lost.  Kidney disease can be detected through a simple unobtrusive urine test, followed by a blood test if the test gives the vets cause for concern.  If you only see your vet once a year then ask for a geriatric profile to screen for these kinds of common conditions.

A common mistake to make with older cats is to put down changes in behaviour as the natural result of aging. These include:

  • Drinking more than usual.  Often a sign of kidney disease or hyperthyroidism.
  • Deteriorating coat condition
  • Poor teeth
  • Not jumping as high as he used to
  • Sleeping more than usual
  • Vomiting
  • Weight loss
  • Inappropriate urination
  • Loss of appetite
  • Wandering aimlessly in the night randomly meowing – often a sign of feline dementia which can be managed successfully.

Often this is a sign of a medical problem and almost always it can be treated or at least managed through supplements, diet change, pain relief etc to give your older gentleman a better quality of life that he deserves after bringing you so many years of happiness.  Even some feline cancers are routinely treated often with successful outcomes, so don’t just put these changes down to “getting old” and if you see any changes at all in your older cat take him to the vets immediately.

In our next and final video blog Denise will share some tips on making your cat’s visit to the vets less stressful.

VIDEO BLOG Part 2 of 4: Caring for Your Adult Cat

Tuesday, 17 May 2011 21:36

Denise Morris, Head Nurse at Kitten to Cat gave an informative and entertaining talk recently at the London Pet Show in Kensington.  For those who missed it here are some clips from the talk.  Sorry about the amateur camera work! In case you can’t see the video the key points are summarised below.

 

An adult cat is 3-6 years.  That’s 28-40 in human terms.

A lot of your cat’s adult life is spent sleeping!!

At this stage you should be visiting your vets twice a year for vaccinations, flea and wormers and a general health check.  This is generally a time of good health so your cat’s weight should be stable.  It’s very important to be on the look-out for any change in weight as this is really significant and often a sign of an underlying medical condition.

Diet, obesity and dental care are all important health issues during this stage.   Obesity in particular is common and leads to the same problems as in humans and predisposes your adult cat to diabetes, heart disease and arthritis.

Also be on the look-out for problems urinating. For little boys in particular Cystitis can be a fast moving and deadly problem.

Behavioural issues to consider:

Have one more litter tray than you do cats.

In multi-cat households separate the litter trays.

Separate the food and water bowls.

Be on the look-out for subtle signs of bullying such as going to the toilet outside the litter tray, or if one cat walks out of the room when another walks in.

Failure to address these behavioural issues can cause stress related disorders such as idiopathic cystitis and small changes in your home environment can make a huge difference.

In our next video blog Denise will talk about the “Golden Oldie” or geriatric cat.

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